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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: Myopia ()
Date: March 11, 2010 12:23PM

Bahn mi are delicious around the world! ( the french bread sandwiches ) Central Vietnam in Da Lat had a great version, and only 8000 VND, which comes out to about 0.30 US dollars. WOW!

Also Nha Tran had the most beautiful beaches in the world, very clear water, with shockingly almost no waves in certain areas, which I guess appeals to me because Myopia is a Very Weak simmer. You will get the freshest and tastiest seafood in the world at the restaurants along the beach. Granted the decor will be non-existence, but amazing seafood + cheap beer = great times.

Besides seafood, it is true that the SoCal version of Vietnamese food is the best in the world though. Probably has to do with the consistent quality and cleanliness of the produce and poultry available here.

So far as friendliness goes, for the non-touristy areas that don't rely as much on foreign money, I do admit it was pretty unfriendly.
*ends thread hijack*

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: empError ()
Date: March 15, 2010 02:18PM

Ice told me you wanted to know more about attractions and history of the Netherlands. Maybe it was just a trick to get me into that big ffa, but anyway, here is what I know:

You've already heard about the drug policy, and the red light districts. Many tourists come for the canals, or for 17th century paintings. I've already mentioned Amsterdam above. Should you care to go out of town, a major attraction are the flower fields in Lisse, but I think you may be too late for that, in July. Another attraction are the old windmills. There are many of these, but at a place called Kinderdijk there are many close together. Of course we have lots of beach. They may be crowded in summertime, though, and there is no guarantee of good weather. Another thing that might interest you is our defences against the water. Maybe a regular dyke wouldn't interest you, but in the province of Zealand they built an extensive and expensive system of dams, some of which can be opened to have regular tides. These will only close when there's heavy, dangerous storms. I'm not sure how much of this is open to the public, though.

About Dutch history: the Netherlands and Belgium were part of the Habsburgian empire that also ruled Austria-Hungary and Spain, around 1500. In the next century, an 80-year independence war erupted against Spain, resulting in independence for the northern provinces. Soon, these provinces became a substantial factor internationally, battling the Portuguese, Spanish, French, and English over trade to colonies. Indonesia became the most prominent colony, but there were many settlements or forts along the African and South Asian coast in Dutch hands. Dutch sailors found Australia, and the Dutch were the only Europeans to get a trading post in Japan. In America, some Caribbean islands were in Dutch hands, and there were settlements in Brazil. The most important colony there was New Amsterdam, contemporary New York. Dutch focus was on trade rather than colonization. 1672 was the year of disaster for the republic, as it waged war against England, France, Saxony, and Muenster simultaneously. The French occupied the land for a while, but were driven off by a rebellion against exorbitant taxes. With the fourth Anglo-Dutch war, from 1780-1784, the English surpassed Dutch maritime powers, and the Dutch ceased to be a dominant factor on the seas. New Amsterdam was taken by the English during one of the wars.

Since then, there were occupations by the French under Napoleon, and by the Germans under Hitler. After Napoleon's defeat, Belgium came under Dutch rule, but rebelled and became independent in 1830-1839. After WW II, the Indonesians successfully fought their independence. Suriname became independent much later. Nowadays, the Netherlands Antilles are the only overseas parts of the Netherlands.

That's about it, in a nutshell.

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: UseLess ()
Date: March 21, 2010 08:21PM

Venice is also worth a visit. There is some big old church. Cant remember the name but it's really old and beautiful. Beside that, a city built on water with small canals between the houses is a must see for anyone. really special and in the summer its very nice to sit and have a drink on one of those small resturants and just enjoying life.

Though i never been to naples/napoli myself i think it is also worth a visit. But idk. :/

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: UseLess ()
Date: March 23, 2010 05:09AM

That is the nicest thing anyone has ever done to me. im am horny and more happy than a cherry on a fruitstand. :)

im so happy that im even considering if i should buy you a year of premium membership on www.brazzers.com

but seriously. Naples is nice. and next time, bring a girl with you. romantic places are always alot more.. romantic with a girl or boy whatever gets your cock hard =)

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: -RIPPE- ()
Date: March 23, 2010 06:38AM

izzel likes the donkeydick i heard, but i guess he might also try some italian stallion.

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: -RIPPE- ()
Date: March 23, 2010 02:13PM

ice cold draft beer, there is no better beer in germany, obviously you have a great knowledge of the real deal when it comes to beer science.

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Re: Izzlekizzles Guide To Europe
Posted by: empError ()
Date: April 05, 2010 04:38AM

You shouldn't forget America's manipulation of many third world governments, Izzle.

About places outside Rome in Italy: Firenze (Florence) is nice, if only for the green cathedral they have there. I found nearby Arezzo nice too, but we were there at a time of festivities in August. Maybe it's not as nice without the festivities.

I already commented on the region around Napoli: Pompeii and Ercolaneo are nice for a look into Roman city (but similar to each other). Once you're there, you may also want to visit the Vesuvius volcano, and the Solfatarra (scorched earth), on the other side of Napoli. There you can walk inside a crater, at Pozzuoli. There's also submerged ruins of a Roman city at Bahia, which you can visit with a boat - although that boat did not go out when I arrived there. They said because the sight was bad that day. But I suspect it was because I was the only visitor that day. If you're an experienced (and licenced?) diver, you can also get to those ruins yourself.

And around Rome, there's Ostia Antica, near the coast in the west. And to the northeast, there's Villa Adriana and Villa d'Este, near Tivoli. Villa Adriana used to be an emperor's villa. And villa d'Este is much more recent, with paintings inside (which I found disappointing), but most of all some huge fountains in the gardens.

Of course, there must be many more interesting, historic places in Italy. I think I'll go for Venice too, once.

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